Prepare for them not to care

No Comments Yet | by Elise Perkins

We put a lot (A LOT) of time and effort into our work. Countless hours spent conceptualizing, researching, drafting, creating, editing and then pitching to outsiders whom we hope will find it as riveting as we do.

But sometimes they don’t.

Sometimes you press “send” on a pitch, or publish on an article and then listen to crickets for days.

It’s agonizing, and especially more so if you have a boss who expects your company’s latest findings to be gracing the cover of the Washington Post business section, or beating down offers to appear on CNBC.

I feel your pain.

A few weeks back I wrote a “Ten-Step Checklist for Launching a Report” which I’m sure you followed to a tee. Nevertheless, even if you crossed all of your t’s and dotted your i’s, there are myriad reasons why your story wasn’t picked up: news of the day bumped your TV spot, some other group issued competing data, or maybe your pitch sucked – by the way, have you read Shonali Burke’s “15 Reasons Your PR Pitches Suck?”

The good news is that there are still ways to salvage your work and gain a larger audience outside of the water cooler. Here are a few options to consider:

  • If your company has not yet written your own story about the work, its high time to do so. Blogging allows you to tell the story in your own words. Considering writing for another outlet (LinkedIn, Medium).
  • Cross-post. Share your best data/infographics on alternate sites, integrate into existing conversations on social media by searching similar hashtags, or twitter chats.
  • Create new content. Aside from writing and sharing graphics, think of alternate content you can create – is your work ripe for a podcast, or can you record video with the report authors? Packaging and promoting copy that already plays like a professional interview can help to entice additional outlets to pick it up.
  • Provide value. Continue to monitor reporter’s stories – if they post about something complimentary, reach out to share a data point from your work. Remember that you’re doing this to provide value to them, not yourself.

I’ll echo that last point once more, you’re doing this to provide value for others, not yourself. Sometimes shifting your mindset can break you out of the rut.

We put a lot (A LOT) of time and effort into our work. Countless hours spent conceptualizing, researching, drafting, creating, editing and then pitching to outsiders whom we hope will find it as riveting as we do.

But sometimes they don’t.

Sometimes you press “send” on a pitch, or publish on an article and then listen to crickets for days.

It’s agonizing, and especially more so if you have a boss who expects your company’s latest findings to be gracing the cover of the Washington Post business section, or beating down offers to appear on CNBC.

I feel your pain.

A few weeks back I wrote a “Ten-Step Checklist for Launching a Report” which I’m sure you followed to a tee. Nevertheless, even if you crossed all of your t’s and dotted your i’s, there are myriad reasons why your story wasn’t picked up: news of the day bumped your TV spot, some other group issued competing data, or maybe your pitch sucked – by the way, have you read Shonali Burke’s “15 Reasons Your PR Pitches Suck?”

The good news is that there are still ways to salvage your work and gain a larger audience outside of the water cooler. Here are a few options to consider:

  • If your company has not yet written your own story about the work, its high time to do so. Blogging allows you to tell the story in your own words. Considering writing for another outlet (LinkedIn, Medium).
  • Cross-post. Share your best data/infographics on alternate sites, integrate into existing conversations on social media by searching similar hashtags, or twitter chats.
  • Create new content. Aside from writing and sharing graphics, think of alternate content you can create – is your work ripe for a podcast, or can you record video with the report authors? Packaging and promoting copy that already plays like a professional interview can help to entice additional outlets to pick it up.
  • Provide value. Continue to monitor reporter’s stories – if they post about something complimentary, reach out to share a data point from your work. Remember that you’re doing this to provide value to them, not yourself.

I’ll echo that last point once more, you’re doing this to provide value for others, not yourself. Sometimes shifting your mindset can break you out of the rut.

About Elise Perkins

Elise Perkins founded ep communications in 2014 after seven years of working for trade associations and think tanks. Today she focuses on building brands for businesses and people, using a savvy mix of content and influencer strategies. She sits on the board of Washington Women in Public Relations.

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